Almanac: Artichokes, Compost, and Caterpillars

inside the frame

Time for another brief recap of my activities in the Almanac. Things are starting to green up already!

  • I am growing artichokes this year. The height of ambition and folly, but a fun project. I am growing an improved variety of Imperial Star, which allegedly will grow ‘chokes in the first year. They traditionally need two summers to grow, so what do we do? Fool them. The plan is to grow them for 4 weeks, then plunge them into 40 degree temperatures for ten days. The plants think they have gone through winter and get reprogrammed for their second season artichokes. Counting back on the calendar, that means that I’ve already started my seeds so that they get winterized in time.
  • I got to really get into the cold frame today. The picture above depicts the chicory plants I’m growing. The green dandelion ones are puntarelle. I noticed, alarmingly, that most plants were actually three to five plants growing right on top of each other! I blame my overzealous seed planting in the fall. I dug up the plants and gently separated them out, but we’ll see if I ended up killing them instead. Plants really don’t like getting their root systems messed up. On the other hand, this will give a lot more space for each plant to grow.
  • I moved the compost pile cage so I could start a new pile. I tossed the half-composted stuff in it to give it a good start. Part of the pile includes a couple dozen oyster shells, which I have a feeling I’m gonna be seeing for years. They’ll eventually break down and add calcium to the soil (I hope). The end result of a year of composting? Only this much black gold:
    Compost finish smushed

    Kind of disappointing to have only a cubic foot. My guess it that I probably could have bulked it out a lot more with brown, dry materials. This was mostly kitchen scraps, meaning high-nitrogen compost. At least that’s plant matter that didn’t end up in a landfill.
  • I am trying a new hoop house technique to protect seedlings. I twisted #12ga wire into hoops and I’m using insect-proof garden fabric on top. Often, it’s not the cold that kills seedlings. It’s the wind, the weight of snow, the temperature swings. Covering plants will allow them to live a stress-free life. I am working on how to best secure the fabric with the nylon string you see here.You may be wondering about the “Caterpillars” in the title. These hoops are called chenilles in French; that means “caterpillar,” an analogy to the appearance of those long white tunnels.

    chenille
    It’s going to end up being planted with fava beans and sugar snap peas, most likely.